Madden 25: Tampa Bay Buccaneers Defensive Ratings, Darrelle Revis Best DB in New Madden Game

Jul 26, 2013; Tampa, FL, USA;Tampa Bay Buccaneers cornerback Darrelle Revis (24) practices during training camp at One Buccaneer Place. Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports

The defensive ratings for Madden 25 are out now on the EA Sports website. So let’s take a look at some where the Buccaneers rank on defense.

  • Darrelle Revis is the highest rated Buccaneer, and the most highly rated defensive back in the entire game, with a 97 overall. His 93 Speed and Awareness ratings combine with 99 Man Cover skills and 90 Press skills to earn him the top spot.
  • Gerald McCoy is the next best defensive Buccaneer, with a 93 overall rating. He has 72 Speed, which is just 2 points below the speed of quarterback Josh Freeman, to go with 90 Strength, 96 Power Moves, and 90 Pursuit.
  • Dashon Goldson comes in at 90 overall, and features a 96 hit power. Be prepared to force some fumbles with the video game version of “The Hawk.”
  • The Buccaneers other safety, Mark Barron, is a bit lower on the rankings with an 80 overall score. He is held back by a 60 awareness, but has a 94 hit power and 85 pursuit. The Buccaneers’ safeties will be fearsome for offenses in Madden 25.
  • Young star linebacker Lavonte David just missed being in the 90′s with an 89 overall grade. His agility score comes in just four points behind the score for Doug Martin, meaning he’ll be able to change directions very well on defense in the new Madden game.
  • But it wouldn’t be Madden ratings without some real puzzling decisions. Cody Grimm comes in one point higher in overall ratings than Leonard Johnson (71 to 70). In fact, Johnson and Anthony Gaitor have the same overall ranking, which is as far from reality as possible.
  • Rookie defensive ends William Gholston and Steven Means both received a 67 overall rating. Means has higher speed, but lower strength than Gholston, but both ends balance out to have the same score. Akeem Spence and Johnthan Banks have a score of 71 and 72, respectively.
  • And finally, my boy Danny Gorrer is criminally underrated, earning a 64 rating in Madden 25. He only has an 88 speed, which is a bit unfair, and his coverage skill scores are similar to those of outside linebacker Jacob Cutrera. Madden definitely got this one wrong.

So what do you think about the Bucs defenders’ Madden 25 rankings? Let us know in the comments below.

Topics: Madden 25, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

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  • PINN

    Madden ratings are a joke. Plain and simple. They should move away from the Ratings system as a whole.

  • RussMillerWY

    They do a lot of slapdash guesswork on the 3rd string and below players. They also update practically every week in the regular season, though. If Gorrer gets playing time and makes some picks, he’ll move up, especially his awareness scores. Madden may be just a game, but I find the incredibly thorough rating system and how they come up with each rating fascinating. As far as I can tell, there is no other database that attempts to do what it does. Definitely more useful than results-based stats alone, but not as useful as coaches’ film for evaluating players.

    • LeoTPP

      For football there is no database like it, but the database for Football (soccer) Manager is actually predictive. They have scouts that find players who will be great, and give them high potentials. It’s so accurate that some teams use Football Managers’ rankings during scouring.

      But for American football, there is no equal ratings database.

      • RussMillerWY

        Yeah, I saw where EA came out with an American Football coach/general manager simulator a few years ago, then quietly let it die. They seem to want to keep the Madden game accessible to casual gamers (let’s face it, adolescents) who want to play arcade style, which creates too many unrealistic kinks that arcade gamers are always quick to exploit to stoke their egos. Head to head mode online can be a lot of fun, but it ruins the potential for creating a simulation that everyone would finally be able to take seriously.

    • PINN

      It’s completely uneven when it relates to the gameplay itself. If the ratings were standalone, maybe it would make sense. But the way these ratings influence the game is absolutely horrible.

      • RussMillerWY

        They still have a ways to go and, unfortunately because they have exclusive rights to the NFL teams and players, they have no competition to pressure them into getting it right. I do think some positions are done fairly well, like wide receiver. The defensive ends are not, especially because a bug makes the right OT into a pass rush turnstyle. My left defensive end, no matter who he is, is nearly always up for league MVP. In head to head games, too many gamers will exploit a lateral speed advantage to do one wide sweep after another, too. Still, it has its moments, and I’m quite looking forward to “breaking down coaches’ film” to set my regular season roster after the game’s released. That’s one area where Madden will always beat the real life equivalent, haha, the powerful replay engine.