Nov 11, 2013; Tampa, FL, USA; Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Mike Glennon (8) scrambles out of the pocket during the second half of the game against the Miami Dolphins at Raymond James Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Rob Foldy-USA TODAY Sports

Why Greg Schiano is Mike Glennon’s Best Friend and Worst Enemy at the Same Time


Nov 11, 2013; Tampa, FL, USA; Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Mike Glennon (8) throws his wristbands to cheering fans after the second half of the game against the Miami Dolphins at Raymond James Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Rob Foldy-USA TODAY Sports

No other head coach in the NFL would trust Mike Glennon the way Greg Schiano does.

No other coach in the league recruited Glennon out of high school, and no other coach in the league would put his sinking ship of a team in the hands of a third round rookie with accuracy and decision-making concerns coming out of college.

That’s why Greg Schiano is the best coach Mike Glennon could have, because it’s given him an opportunity to prove himself at the NFL level earlier in his career than any other coach would have allowed. So as such, he should be thankful for Schiano for the opportunity, and do his best on the field.

And it seems as though Glennon is doing his best. He does not have the arm strength people claim he has, and if he does then he does not apply it during games. So he compensates for his lack of arm strength (or his lack of faith in what arm strength he has) by throwing check downs and waiting for receivers to come out of their breaks before throwing passes.

Glennon rarely throws a receiver open, and cannot hit a deep pass to save his own life. But Greg Schiano has given him the keys to the offense, and he’s managed to check down his way to a somewhat successful start to his NFL career.

That said, no other coach would misuse Mike Glennon the way Greg Schiano does.

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have only hit on one deep pass since Mike Glennon took over as quarterback, and that pass was hauled in with one hand around a defender by Vincent Jackson. Were it not for Vincent’s miraculous catch, Mike Glennon would still be waiting for his first completion deep down the field.

But that’s not going to stop Greg Schiano from continuing to call these plays every week, and absolutely killing the offense’s momentum.

In an article in the Tampa Bay Times, Schiano was quoted as saying that “we’re going to see him do it in games,” when referring to deep passes connecting, and then the Buccaneers head coach proclaimed that he does it in practice, so it should show up in the games sooner rather than later.

In the same article, Glennon himself said “”We’re going to keep firing out shots … when it presents itself… I just have to keep trusting my eyes, and when I think it’s there, let it fly.” So rather than working on building upon the success Glennon has had in the intermediate passing game, the Tampa Bay offense will continue to stubbornly try to have Mike Glennon throw the ball deep to Vincent Jackson and Skye Dawson for incomplete passes that set the team behind the chains in terms of down and distance.

Glennon is among the worst in the NFL in yards per attempt, so asking him to move the offense with a 2nd-and-10 or 3rd-and-8 because he missed a deep throw on first or second down is asking a lot of the rookie signal caller. He’s good on short to intermediate throws, and for some reason defenses allow Vincent Jackson and company to find space within 20 yards of the line of scrimmage where Glennon is more confident and more capable of getting them the football.

Mike Glennon has shown moments of being capable as a game-managing quarterback who allows a good running game and good defense to carry the burden of earning wins. But Greg Schiano and his staff are going to continue to force the deep pass upon Glennon and continue to watch him miss horribly.

So Glennon should be thankful to Schiano for the opportunity to start, but frustrated about the awful offense he plays in and is forced to run every week.

Tags: Featured Mike Glennon Popular Tampa Bay Buccaneers

  • Jayson Kaplan

    At best, Glennon was a project QB, one that should have held a clipboard and learned the ins and outs of NFL football for a season or two where he’d maybe develop into a decent game-managing backup QB. This guy was never meant to be an NFL starter.

    Instead, he was thrust into being a rookie starter for an 0-4 team that just dumped its franchise QB for him. That’s a lot of pressure and I think because he didn’t immediately curl up into a ball and cry, most of the media gave him a pass and ignored his shortcomings and poor decision-making. It was amusing to hear people praise Mike Glennon for doing the same things they criticized Josh Freeman for doing the week before.

    Glennon may get a spot on another NFL roster next year. After all, it’s 32 team league and the talent pool is still watered down pretty heavily.

    • LeoTPP

      There’s no reason for Glennon to not be the backup in Tampa Bay next year. If I am the Buccaneers, I don’t give him away for less than a first. He’d be a capable backup for any new starter.

      • Jayson Kaplan

        I’m not sure there’s anyone willing to trade a first rounder for a guaranteed backup QB. More valuable players have been dealt in recent seasons for lesser picks than that. I respect your desire to get value back for him but I don’t see a trade partner stepping up to give us a fist rounder for a 3rd round picked Qb that so far looks like he was over-drafted. We’ll see how it plays out. You never know what an NFL team might do.

  • Centrale

    Well, the bottom line is, we have to still make some attempts at deep passes in order to keep defenses from completely locking down on the shorter passes. But I agree, I haven’t seen one accurate long throw from the guy yet. He’s gotta keep trying, but maybe only in 2nd and short situations.

    • LeoTPP

      Unsuccessful deep passes don’t really do much to scare a defense, especially when they’re as bad as Glennon’s. Why respect him to beat a team deep when he doesn’t come close?

      • Centrale

        Because if they don’t keep covering the deep passes, the receivers are good enough to adjust to any wild turkey he throws down there.

  • Mic

    I agree with everything you say about Schiano trusting him, but……

    YOU HAVEN’T BEEN WATCHING

    “Glennon rarely throws a receiver open” “waiting for receivers to come out of their breaks before throwing passes.”

    you are making uneducated claims in which you have not been watching games, examples that come straight to mind watch Underwood last Monday vs Miami and Wright vs Philly when Wright runs his out route where the linebacker is covering him, watch how Glennon is hitting them right out of their breaks. He is what doing what you call throwing a receiver open and anticipating their breaks.

    You call him captain checkdown but from what we saw from Freeman in the first 3 games, the offense minus the checkdowns from this offense had our offense going nowhere.So, is it really Glennon’s fault or the route concepts/Receivers not getting open, Btw the backs are picking up a lot more YAC with Glennon throwing these checkdowns because he’s throwing them open.

    All we can ask from a rookie qb right now and that is to get better his yards per attempt aren’t where we want it to be but that is also gradually getting better ie Seattle 7.3, Miami 6.6

    If Glennon doesn’t continually get better I’m all for drafting a qb in next years draft

    • LeoTPP

      Are you seriously claiming that I don’t watch games? Come on now.

      The first pass to Underwood on Monday night, Glennon waited until the WR was making his break and his man fell down. He didn’t throw him open, Underwood just won his one-on-one.

      And I am trying to find the play you’re talking about against Philly. He did make a couple of decent throws to Wright on intermediate routes against linebackers, with one example of him throwing low in a “throw it where only my guy can get it” sort of deal.

      But I don’t see any consistent evidence of him throwing guys open. And the fact that you have to think back to Week 6 to find the last time you thought he threw a guy open speaks volumes.

      And comparing Mike Glennon to Josh Freeman is stupid, accomplishes nothing, and serves only to try to start a fight that doesn’t need to happen. Freeman sucked in 2013 with the Bucs. Now he’s gone. Now we have to evaluate Mike Glennon on his own. He’s better than Freeman. Everything from stats to film prove that.

      Glennon is not making good decisions, and he’s not showing the skills he needs to be an above average quarterback (or even an average quarterback) in this league. He just shows flashes. He needs to improve a lot to earn my trust by the end of the season.

  • Mic

    I came to your article cause it was the first article shown when looking up “Mike Glennon” read it and came to conclusion you aren’t evaluating him correctly I do believe you do watch the games

    He hits receivers in stride/throws them open multiple times a game, but those were what immediately came to mind

    How do you know he’s not making good decisions on a consistent basis? Do you see the receivers routes on plays and access who’s open or not? because I can only see what the camera man shows, the problem may not be Glennon, is what I’m pointing out it could very well be route concepts/receivers not getting open

    Another throw in Miami, 4 seams Rainey comes out of backfield runs an out for 5 yards Glennon leads him 12 yard gain allows him to gain yac, Gruden points it out

    Tim wright-Miami 19 yard gain because hes allowed to pick up YAC

    Tim wright- Seattle seam route the one where Thomas gets flagged for targeting

    Brian leonard Seattle- 19 yard gain runs an angle route Glennon throws him open from a linebacker it was 3rd and 4

    I pointed the week 6 game because it was the same route Wright ran over and over again which is insane, and each time he anticipated Wright coming out of the break. A very easy one to find is the 3rd down play in red zone Wright drops Glennon squeezes it in between safety and linebacker where it comes to fast Wright drops it, it was about the 4th straight time we ran it because Philly continually gave us that man look with 1 safety on top

    We may be having differentiating thoughts of what throwing a receiver open is if we are show me an example and I’ll find a similar throw Glennon made that comes to mind

    9td 4int through 5 games, if he can continue to improve thats all you can ask for from a rookie qb, we got 8 more games to go

    • LeoTPP

      I went back and watched the PHI game and looked for every play involving Tim Wright. Here you go:

      Catch 1 – Waited for him to have already made his break, and is wide open. Passed up opportunity for open receiver down the seam by focusing in on Wright.

      Catch 2 – Waited for him to have already made his break and shove off his defender, and he is wide open.

      Catch 3 – Came out of the backfield uncovered. Good throw in stride, but not a special throw because of how wide open Wright was. Sure, Josh Freeman may not have made this throw, but who cares? We’re evaluating Mike Glennon not Josh Freeman.

      Catch 4 – Allowed free release after his defender slips and falls. Easy throw down the seam.

      Catch 5 – Wright had already made three steps out of his break and was so wide open that I could have thrown him the ball.

      Incompletion at 7:21 3rd quarter – Wright runs the same route he’s been running all game, and Glennon throws it way behind him. Awful throw. You could claim it was a miscommunication, but why would Wright not be running the same route he’s run all game against the same defender in the same coverage?

      Catch 6 – A very well-placed throw made well after Wright made his break, and late enough that a safety was able to charge up and could have made a play on a worse throw. Full credit for the placement, but he waited far too long.

      Catch 7 – For only the second time this game, Wright is running a route that isn’t an out. He’s running a post and has a bit of seperation, and Glennon throws low and towards the middle of the field so Wright can be the only one to catch it, but with no YAC opportunities. Still a pretty good throw.

      Incompletion at 10:58 4th quarter (the one you refer to as a Wright drop) – Awful ball placement. I doubt it’s even a drop, it appears to be more of a pass breakup because the ball is thrown behind Wright as he comes out of his break and the defender (on his inside) is able to reach in and push the ball down to his chest. There was no window to throw it in as you refer to, Wright was in man-to-man and had plenty of room to the outside to work for an easy touchdown.

      In other words, your definition of his “amazing” ability to hit him out of the break has low standards. He waits to see if Wright is open, and then throws. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it’s an average QB skill. Good QBs throw during or before the break and that often provides even better YAC opportunities and less chance of broken up passes and interceptions.

      • Mic

        Never said he was amazing just pointing receivers are coming out of breaks and he’s throwing it.

        The throw i was referring too he had to throw it where it had to be, the route was being recycled and the saftey was all over it beaming down on Wright to help out he had no chance to continue to work outside cause Wright was being doubled covered by safety and linebcker if he waited any longer there, the window would be gone.

        I also like to add I like your articles with screen caps(Lorig) would like to see more of those

        • LeoTPP

          I appreciate it. I just don’t see the same things you see from Glennon, and I am waiting to see them because his development or lack thereof really shapes where the Bucs go next season.

  • Mic

    I have no idea who you are and how credible you are, I came to your article cause it was the first article shown when looking up “Mike Glennon”. I read it and came to conclusion you aren’t evaluating him correctly I do believe you do watch the games.

    He hits receivers in stride multiple times a game, but those were what immediately came to mind

    How do you know he’s not making good decisions on a consistent basis? Do you see the receivers routes on plays and assess who’s open or not? because I can only see what the camera man shows, the problem may not be Glennon is what I’m pointing out it could very well be route concepts/receivers not getting open

    Underwood 3rd catch i believe and the first I’ll count that as negligible but he threw to an open area which also allowed Underwood to pick up yac, right across the db’s face

    Another throw in Miami, 4 seams Rainey comes out of backfield runs an out for 5 yards Glennon leads him 12 yard gain allows him to gain yac, Gruden even pointed it out

    Tim wright-Miami 19 yard gain because hes allowed to pick up YAC

    Tim wright- Seattle seam route the one where Thomas gets flagged for targeting

    Brian leonard Seattle- 19 yard gain runs an angle route Glennon throws him open from a linebacker it was 3rd and 4

    I pointed the week 6 game because it was the same route Wright ran over and over again which is insane, and each time he anticipated Wright coming out of the break. A very easy one to find is the 3rd down play in red zone Wright drops Glennon squeezes it in between safety and linebacker where it comes to fast Wright drops it, it was about the 4th straight time we ran it because Philly continually gave us that man look with 1 safety on top

    We may be having differentiating thoughts of what throwing a receiver open is if we are show me an example of what you think it is and I’ll try think of a similar throw Glennon made that comes to mind.

    9td 4int through 5 games, if he can continue to improve thats all you can ask for from a rookie qb, we got 8 more games to go